Monday, December 31, 2012

Happy New Year From Rug Ideas!

We at Rug Ideas would like to wish everyone a happy and safe New Years celebration! We have made many new friends this year and plan to make even more for 2013, which is coincidentally our 60th anniversary under our parent company, Sobco International. We strive to always bring you the best customer service as well as the expert repairs/cleaning/appraisals that we are known for.
We want to remind everyone that we are running great sales during the month of January, so stop by our showroom so we can help you find the perfect rug for your home or office. We have an extensive selection of beautiful handmade rugs and runners, as well as stock some machine made pieces as well for people on a budget. 
And if you have a rug that is in need of repair, Rug Ideas is your answer as we have a team of master weavers who handle specific types of rugs which they have expertise in, so you know your repair will come out fantastic. We can take care of securing ends, replacing the selvages(sides), reweaving, as well as custom jobs including new canvas backings(for tufted rugs), leather strips to prevent curling and downsizing of rugs.
And if you have had any holiday parties where your rug/s have been dirtied/soiled, bring them in or call us right away so we can help you with cleaning and stain removal to get them back into shape. Here's wishing you a Happy New Year and a festive Holiday Season...from Rug Ideas!

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Rugs From Iran - Village Weaves

The Kurdish town of Senneh (now Sanandaj) lies in the mountains some miles from the frontier with Iraq. Here, some of the thinnest and most sophisticated rugs you can find are woven - quite different to the thick, heavy carpets that are woven in many places in Kurdistan. The pile yarn, warp and weft threads are all extremely thin, and the knot count is very high. The Persian asymmetrical knot is known as the Senneh knot. Senneh is a small town with comparatively few weavers, and manufacturing takes a long time because the rugs are so fine that production is limited. There are few variations in patterns, which mainly consist of pink roses, herati, and mir-i-boteh motifs. Roses and boteh are woven in rows over the whole rug, while the herati motifs are used in medallions and the four corners. The predominant color in early rugs is indigo with plenty of subdued red; late 19th and early 20th century rugs are usually cream, soft red and pale green
Sarouk rugs are good quality, with the wool pile clipped short or medium-long. The designs are separated into traditional and American patterns. Traditional designs include the boteh and herati motifs, but the most impressive is the medallion and corner scheme. Early 20th century American designs feature large floral sprays, which radiate out from the central medallion. Ferahan carpets were the finest in west-central Iran in the 19th century, and the name was synonymous with the herati pattern (a rhomboid surrounded by four small fishes.

*sourced from 'Carpet Style' by Marty Phillips

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Turkish Kilim - Cleaning & Repair

A customer of ours recently brought in a Turkish Kilim of hers to be deep cleaned as it had not been washed in about 2 years. While we were doing our inspection of the kilim, it was immediately noticeable the the ends of the kilim were not secured and unraveling had started to occur. Take a look below:
Due to this unraveling parts of the design of the kilim were starting to be lost. The owner opted to have us do the securing so she could save the kilim from further damage. We first secured the damaged areas, so that the cleaning would not make any further damage. After the deep cleaning process was complete, one of our master weavers started work on the securing of both ends. Take a look at the results:
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Not only was this kilim beautified by the deep cleaning (the colors are more vibrant as they had been covered by a layer of dust and dirt) but it's structure is now secure with the work done to the ends. Our customer was so happy that the unraveling had been stopped, and that her kilim now looked brand new. Another day, another smile... at Rug Ideas!

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

How to Store Your Rugs

The biggest dangers for rugs placed in storage are BUGS, FLOODS, and THUGS. Insect damage, flood or mildew damage, and theft are the most common problems we hear from clients who have placed rugs in a local storage unit or placed in a far corner of a closet or garage. Many times rugs with high appraised or sentimental value are placed in storage to save them for family members, or to save them from a remodel mess, or to protect them from the summer sunlight. You want to make sure you are not actually causing damage by incorporating the wrong storage procedures.
• DO clean rugs before wrapping for storage. The first, most important piece of storage advice is to always store rugs clean. Never wrap up dirty rugs. Have them washed properly and then prepared for storage, otherwise there’s a chance you’ll wrap hungry little rug-snacking critters in with your rug in a nice, protected environment, and in a year or more, when you open it up again, you could be in for an ugly, expensive surprise.You must clean your rugs of food and liquid material because though moths are normally the storage “bad guys” – ANY insect will eat sugars and other food materials, and they will eat the wool fibers that are holding this meal for them too.
• DO roll your rugs starting at the bottom end to the top end, fuzzy side inside. To find the bottom end of your rug, you want to “pet” your rug to determine when you are going WITH the nap, and AGAINST the nap. When you run your hand WITH the grain, it will take you to the tassels of the bottom of the rug (where the weaver began weaving your rug). Roll from this end. Folding rugs causes cracking over time, so do not fold rugs being put in storage.
• DO roll your SILK rugs with the fuzzy side outside. Wool and cotton rugs have more “give” to them than silk rugs, so when placing silk rugs into storage, roll them with their fuzzy silk side outside.
• DO wrap your rugs in TYVEK or brown acid-free PAPER. Wool has a moisture content even when it is dry, so changes in heat will cause it to “sweat.” Because of this you can NEVER wrap wool rugs in plastic or you will create a mildew problem. Tyvek Paper is best (tear and water resistant).
• DO elevate your rug packages off of the ground. Many storage facilities are built in lowlands that have a tendency to flood during bad weather, so whether in your home or their location you always want to keep rugs at least six inches off the ground in case flooding occurs.
• DO make certain nothing heavy is stacked on top of your rugs. Heavy items can cause damage to the rug’s foundation.
• DO acquire insurance to protect your rugs when placed in a storage facility. You also want a photograph and appraisal on file in case you need them.
Find the Best Rug Storage Location
For those of you who like to switch your rugs out to create a fresh look in your d├ęcor, or to save them from too much wear, take care to properly store your rugs according to theTextile Museum in Washington, D.C.
The best location for the storage of your collection would be in a room that is cool, dry and where blinds or curtains block natural light. Few of us have the luxury of having a spare room that we can devote to storage, and have to make do with closets, cupboards and under beds.While it is possible to adapt many spaces in the house for storage, avoid using attics and basements, which are usually without climate control and suffer the largest swings in temperature and relative humidity.
Maintaining Rug Storage Areas
Most moth and carpet beetle infestations appear in rugs that were improperly stored. Sometimes infestations will start while the rug is in use, and then quickly accelerates when the piece is stored. It is, therefore, important to have a good housekeeping plan for your storage areas. Every couple months unroll at least one rug to make sure that there is no evidence of infestation. Choose a different rug each month. Wipe off shelving and shelf padding, and if necessary clean or replace dustcovers and padding. Vacuum the room thoroughly to eliminate insect-attracting dust. Remove dust from all baseboards and windowsills as well.

sourced from: referralcarpetcare.com & arearugfacts.com
Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Monday, December 17, 2012

The Americas - Navajo Rugs

Navajo Rugs have a tremendous visual impact, which reflects the strength of Navajo culture and their tradition as a people. Weaving designs evolved from simple beginnings in the 18th century, and became more elaborate in response to changing demands during the second half of the 19th century. Today, they have returned to a newfound simplicity. The method of weaving has remained virtually unchanged, and is basically the tapestry- or flat weave technique used in Middle Eastern kilims.
The Spanish introduced sheep into Old Navajo Land near New Mexico in the 16th century, and the nomadic Navajo acquired large flocks from them and became famous for the blankets that they wove for their own use. During the complex history of banishment and then their return to a diminished territory, Navajo's weaving was influenced by many factors, including shortage of wool and the weaving of their neighbors, the Pueblo.
When the Navajo first acquired their flocks, they spun the yarn from their own fleece, and they have returned to this today. During the intervening period, they bought commercial yarns that were available in a choice of string, bright colors. Today's pieces are brightly colored, sturdy, and largely made up of stripes or diamond motifs. Unlike Middle Eastern work, individual Navajo weavers may become well-known for the quality of their weaving and designs, and a particular weaver's work can be more expensive that that of other weavers. The weaving is done by women who learn through a "watch and do" process.

*sourced from 'Carpet Style' by Barty Phillips

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Afshar Rug - Expert Repair

We had an interesting story come in during one of our customer visits recently. A repeat customer of ours brought in his beautiful Afshar rug, that we had cleaned and repaired a year earlier, that now had a tear near one of the corners. It turns out his dog managed to get a small ball under the rug and while trying to get it out, chewed/tore a small piece of the rug. Take a look below:
This Afshar is worth quit a bit of money so the owner was understandably concerned. He also knew that we do outstanding repairs so he opted for one of our master weavers to do the reweave. All the the work was done by hand and the results came out fabulous! Take a look below:
This Afhsar rug has been expertly restored and you cannot tell that this rug had ever been ripped/torn by a dog. Our customer was thrilled with the outcome of our repair work and left our store a very happy man. If you have a rug that has come across some damage due to pets, furniture, water damage, etc. bring it in to Rug Ideas where we can help step you through all your options to get it back into great shape!

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Gabbeh Rugs For Sale!! 25% OFF

Today we are showcasing 2 great Gabbeh rugs that will brighten up anyone's home. They are both Rug Ideas production rugs and utilize hand spun wool and have all natural vegetable dyes. These are "green rugs"!
Take a look below:
The rug above measures 3'7" x 5'4" and has a great price of just $1950. And if you buy it before the year (2012) ends we'll give you an extra 25% OFF! That's a great bargain for a beautiful, high quality Gabbeh from Iran.

Next we bring you another Gabbeh with the same hand spun wool and natural vegetable dyes. Take a look below:
The above rug measures 3'8" x 5'2" and has a price of $1975. Buy this rug before 2012 ends and you will get the same 25% OFF as the last Gabbeh shown! Pick up one or both of these lovely pieces today at Rug Ideas!

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

European Rugs - France

Seventeenth-century French hand-knotted carpets are rare today, but examples from the Savonnerie and Aubusson workshops are much sought. The name Savonnerie is a term that is often applied generically to all hand-knotted carpets of French origin, and indicates pile carpets of extreme luxury. The Savonnerie workshop was founded in 1627 in Chaillot, in a former soap works. From the start, the intention was to produce carpets of superb technical quality, using only the best materials and the finest knotting with a deep, velvet-like pile. Carpets were woven purely for the court or the state, and closely reflected the tastes of the period - heavy, scrolling acanthus leaves and dark grounds during Louis XIV's reign; rococo with twisting leaves and floral swags during the time of Louis XV; and a more restrained style for Louis XVI.
At Aubusson, an early tapestry-weaving center, two completely different types of carpet were woven - pile carpets, similar but inferior to those of the Savonnerie, in weaving and materials; and flat-woven carpets using the tapestry technique, which were quicker, easier and cheaper and were bought by the nobility and better-off merchants. They followed the stylistic evolution of Savonnerie carpets, but had simpler designs. The style of both Savonnerie and Aubusson carpets had an enormous influence on overseas production, so between the end of the 18th century and the mid-19th century, the French carpet became - even in the Orient and especially in Anatolia - the model to imitate.
During the 19th century, a number of needlework schools came into existence in France and the United States, and a great many fine carpets were produced.

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Persian and Oriental Rugs in Los Angeles


What sets us apart from our colleagues when it comes to rugs is that we share our knowledge with our customers. If a customer wants to buy a rug from us or brings in a rug for cleaning or repair, we show her the origin of her rug on the map and the city in which her rug was made.

For example if she buys a Heriz rug from us or brings in a Heriz rug for cleaning or repair, we show her where Heriz is on the map. That is the closest city to Tabriz in north west Iran. In this little town, designs of the rugs are geometric and not curvilinear.

We also have a real but small rug loom and show our customers how rugs are made and position rugs as objects of art and labor of love. By doing this, our customers appreciate the rug they buy from us or the rugs they have at home. They will then take good care of rugs and treasure them.
After present weavers retire or die, no one is going to take their places. Their kids do not have the passion and in many instances do not stay in their villages or small tows. Besides, these kids do not have the patience to sit down behind the looms for many hours per day. So this is a vanishing art and tradition. We have to treasure and appreciate it while we have it.


Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Monday, December 3, 2012

Rugs From Europe - Scandinavia

Scandinavia has a long tradition of weaving natural homespun flat-weave and shaggy colorful rugs that are necessary in order to cope with the long, dark days of the Scandinavian winter. This is a home or cottage industry, with a continuous tradition over the centuries. It has never died out, but had evolved, particularly during the 20th century, to produce highly modern designs and patterns that are based on ancient motifs.
Rya rugs are double-pile rugs, thick and shaggy, made for warmth in various parts of Scandinavia (especially Finlad), and they may have been inspired by the animal skins that would originally have been used as rugs and coverlets. They date back at least to the 10th century, and were used both as floor coverings and bed covers. They were initially in solid colors, but by the late 18th century, they were being decorated with designs taken from pattern books imported from France and Germany.
The double-weave Scandinavian rugs and pillows from the south of Sweden, known as rolakans, also have a particular boldness in juxtapositions of clear, bright colors, together with that clarity and simplicity of design that is particular to Scandinavia. They were often woven in wide stripes or repeating interlocking triangles, using plain rather than split-weave technique. These rugs use patterns that seem to have survived, more or less unchanged, since Viking times.

*sourced from 'Carpet Style' by Marty Phillips

Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
Tel. 310-770-9085

Sunday, December 2, 2012

Shahsavan Horse Trappings Textiles

Shahsevans/Shahsavans are nomadic pastoralist tribesmen and women who live in north west Iran in the province of Ardabil in Moghan area close to the border of Russia. They have great culture of textile weaving. They mostly make fine flat weaves called sumacs in small sizes. These pieces are utilitarian objects of art that they can use in their everyday tribal life.

Here, I am posting a picture of a horse trapping which is very finely woven. These trappings are ornamental and in some instances ceremonial textiles and accessories. This one is roughly 3' x 4' from my personal collection. Just take a look at the strange designs and motives.


Dr. Khosrow Sobhe (Dr. Kay)
Certified Rug Specialist (CRS)
www.LosAngelesRugCleaning.com
www.RugIdea.com
310-770-9085